Emergency Numbers & VHF Channels

ALL NUMBERS ARE AREA CODE 207 UNLESS NOTED
Coast Guard
  • Emergency 767-0303
  • South Portland 799-1680
  • Boothbay 633-2661
  • Rockland 596-6667
  • Southwest Harbor 244-4270
  • Jonesport 497-3404
  • Eastport 853-0684
Canadian Coast Guard
  • Saint John, NB 800-563-2444
Maine Marine Patrol Emergencies
  • NH border to Brunswick 800-482-0730
  • Midcoast 800-452-4664
  • Penobscot Bay to Canadian Border 800-432-7381
Warden Service
  • Maine Department of Inland Fisheries & Wildlife 287-8000
  • Augusta 452-4664
  • Bangor 432-7381
  • Gray 800-228-0857
  • Operation Game Thief 800-253-7887 / 287-6057
Sheriff’s Departments
  • York County 324-1113
  • Cumberland County 893-2810
  • Sagadahoc County 443-8201
  • Lincoln County 882-6576
  • Knox County 594-0429
  • Waldo County 338-6786
  • Hancock County 667-7575
  • Washington County 255-4422
Hospitals
  • Poison Control Center 800-222-1222
  • Maine Medical Center, Portland 662-0111
  • Mercy Hospital, Portland 879-3000
  • Mid Coast Hospital, Brunswick 373-6000
  • St. Andrew's Hospital, Boothbay Harbor 633-2121
  • Penobscot Bay Medical Center, Rockport 921-8000
  • Waldo County General Hospital, Belfast 338-2500
  • Eastern Maine Medical Center, Bangor 973-8000
  • Mount Desert Island Hospital, Bar Harbor 288-5081
  • Downeast Community Hospital, Machias 255-3356
Marine Resources
  • Marine Animal Reporting Hotline 800-532-9551
  • Red Tide and Shellfish Sanitation Hotline 800-232-4733 / 624-7727

Updated 02/2017

 

 
CELLULAR PHONE SERVICE

With cellular phones and cellular service now commonplace ashore, many boaters also carry cell phones on board. In theory, all of the coast of Maine has cellular coverage, but a cell phone is by no means a substitute for a VHF radio. The cellular coverage for the Maine coast is currently a collage of cells covered by various mobile service providers, and the size and control of the cells is in constant flux. Consider the cellular phone an important complement to the VHF.

VHF Marine Radio Channels

  • 6 Intership Safety
  • 7, 8 Commercial
  • 9  Boater Calling. Commercial and Non-Commercial.
  • 10 Commercial
  • 11 Pilot Boats
  • 12 Port Operations
  • 13 Intership Navigation Safety (Bridge-to-bridge). Ships >20m length maintain a listening watch on this channel in US waters.
  • 14 Port Operations
  • 15 Environmental (Receive only) Used by class C EPIRBs.
  • 16 International Distress, Safety and Calling. Ships required to carry radio, USCG, and most coast stations maintain a listening watch on this channel.
  • 17 State & local government maritime control
  • 18, 19 Commercial
  • 21 U.S. Coast Guard only
  • 22 CG Liason and Maritime Safety Information Broadcasts. Broadcasts announced on channel 16.
  • 23 U.S. Coast Guard only
  • 24-28 Public Correspondence (Marine Operator)
  • 65, 66 Port Operations
  • 68,69,71 Non-Commercial
  • 72 Non-Commercial, Intership only.
  • 73, 74, 77 Port Operations
  • 78 Non-Commercial
  • 81 U.S. Government only - Environmental protection operations.
  • 82 U.S. Government only
  • 83 U.S. Coast Guard only
  • 84, 85, 86, 87 Public Correspondence (Marine Operator).
  • 88 Commercial, Intership only.

Procedure for VHF Channel 16 MAYDAY

Source: U.S. Coast Guard

If you have a VHF marine radio, tune it to channel 16. Unless you know you are outside VHF range of shore and ships, call on channel 16 first.

  1. Distress signal "MAYDAY", spoken three times.
  2. The words "THIS IS", spoken once.
  3. Name of vessel in distress (spoken three times) and call sign or boat registration number, spoken once.
  4. Repeat "MAYDAY" and name of vessel, spoken once.
  5. Give position of vessel by latitude or longitude or by bearing (true or magnetic, state which) and distance to a well-known landmark such as a navigational aid or small island, or in any terms which will assist a responding station in locating the vessel in distress. Include any information on vessel movement such as course, speed and destination.
  6. Nature of distress (sinking, fire etc.).
  7. Kind of assistance desired.
  8. Number of persons onboard.
  9. Any other information which might facilitate rescue, such as length or tonnage of vessel, number of persons needing medical attention, color hull, cabin, masks, etc.
  10. The word "OVER".

Stay by the radio if possible. Even after the message has been received, the Coast Guard can find you more quickly if you can transmit a signal on which a rescue boat or aircraft can home.